Review: In Search of Pure Lust by Lise Weil

works

Lise Weil quotes Adrienne Rich: “I choose to love this time for once with all my intelligence.” This approach to loving seems to be the exact conceit of Weil’s intimate memoir. Frequent references to H.D., Virginia Woolf, Mary Daly–as well as run-ins in with Audre Lorde–work to create a robust, and sometimes surprising, portrait of the second wave feminist movement. Throughout In Search of Pure Lust, Weil is driven by this intellectual, all-in loving. In her many relationships, Weil lusts for woman not only as partners and lovers, but as poets, scholars, and visionaries.

Read the full review at Lambda

“Lesbians Will Always Be Here And Have Always Been Here”: Talking Queer Visibility, Butchness, And Sinister Wisdom With Writer Carina Julig

works

I sit down with fellow writer Carina Julig to learn about her time with the journal and what lesbian art means today. Julig is a lesbian journalist whose work touches on the intersections of queerness, capitalism, politics, and trans masculine identities. Featured on SlateAl-Jazeera, and them., among others, Julig has a keen instinct for the impacts of lesbian culture on the mainstream and vice versa.

Read the full interview at BUST.

Inventing Adulthood: Four Novels Reveal the Magic of Queer Self-Actualization

works

What does it mean to come of age as a 20-something queer person with no money, no resources, and no illusions about respectability? Black Wave is one of several recent books—including Andrea Lawlor’s Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl (2017), Ariel Gore’s We Were Witches (2017) and Chelsey Johnson’s Stray City (2018)—that seek to answer this question, and each author insists that queer self-actualization requires a radically different approach to adulthood.

Read the full article at Bitch Media.

Review: Long Love by Judith Barrington

works

Judith Barrington’s Long Love is a collection of new and selected poems celebrating her impressive tenure as a writer. Drawing from Trying to Be an Honest Woman (1985), History and Geography (1989), as well as more recent works like Lost Lands (2008), this latest collection is anchored by Barrington’s stripped-back voice and generous poetic ear.

Read the full review at Lambda

zine 1: states of change

twiin flame art collective

Screen Shot 2018-09-14 at 9.18.44 PM

 

states of change engages with the messy, scary thoughts that bubble up about life in the anthropocene — a time of rapid changes and uncertain futures — from a leftist & loving, queer and utterly mad perspective.

 

this zine is about climate change and the ways we re/envision future. visual artist roman pace made this zine in the midst of a catastrophic red tide gripping the west coast of florida.

 

~ zines are $9 + shipping ~

 

click here to order via instagram 

click here to order via etsy

visit the Contact Page to order

 

about the artist

 

IMG_9507

roman pace is a non-binary, sapphic artist living in florida. they do collage, poetry, and photography to explore madness and queerness. connect with them on instagram @romanpacestaebler.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

we believe artwork is work. please consider supporting twiin flame and spreading the word!

Screen Shot 2018-09-14 at 9.19.44 PM

How Queer Comics Are Confronting Rape Culture

works

Trauma and triumph have always been source material for queer performers. The difference now is that people with power are starting to pay attention: men, heterosexuals, cisgender people, white people—even the holy trinity of cishet white men. At the cutting edge of this cultural reckoning are comedians Hannah Gadsby, Tig Notaro, and Cameron Esposito. All three are masculine of center (MOC) lesbians, comedians, and survivors of sexual assault and/or abuse.

So why is it that there are not one, but three butchy lesbians talking about rape culture and being taken seriously at the same time? “Cuz you need a good role model, fellas,” quips Gadsby in Nanette.

Read the article in full at Jezebel

about twiin flame art collective

twiin flame art collective

twiin flame art collective is a collaboration between queer southern-based artists. we are poets, photographers, visual artists, printmakers, and zinesters.

 

check out our etsy page here with zines and prints!

 

our first zine, states of change, is out! for the zine and a full selection of prints, visit Instagram @romanpacestaebler 

 

 

 

 

 

 

all art reflects the collective’s values as leftist and loving.

Screen Shot 2018-09-14 at 9.19.44 PM

 

 

want to connect? we love to chat with other queer artist folx! send us an email at twin.flame.collective5@ gmail.com

exploring madness and queerness

twiin flame art collective

Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 3.43.43 PM

roman pace is a sapphic, non-binary artist living in the south. roman places their work within a collective conjuring of queer future. they use collage, photography, and craft to explore the relationship between madness and queerness. they are a co founding member of twiin flame art collective. reach out to them at romanpacestaebler@gmail.com or check out their prints on instagram @romanpacestaebler.

 

 

 

 

enough with the dystopian futures by roman pace. collage. 2018.

fearless by roman pace. 2018. 2

fearless by roman pace. collage 2018.

 

_sapphic ground_ by roman pace. 2018.

on sapphic ground by roman pace. collage. 2018.

 

how far will you take it by roman pace. 2018.

how far will you take it by roman pace. collage. 2018.

 

Las Vegas’ Lesbian Wedding Commercial And The ‘Tolerance Trap’

works

“Now and Then” is shamelessly soap, moving in for every queer person’s soft spot with heat-seeking precision: the homophobic parents, the shame, the emotional release of seeing accepted the little dyke we all root for. It seems like an important step for lesbian visibility in popular culture. So what’s the problem?

The problem is that tolerance is a trap, and the Visit Las Vegas Campaign wants to sell it to you.

Read the article at The Establishment.